Brave Justice

Brave Justice 2

The discrimination toward those with mental illness is a tragedy.  To think that we are still in the midst of comedians joking about those with mental illness, being compared to criminals whenever the thought of mental illness is brought up, while also many saying that gun control is a must due to mental illness or perhaps better involuntary psychiatric hospitalization may be the solution to unimaginable crime within society.  Absurd!  This type of discrimination, stereotyping, stigma needs to stop.  There has to be compassion and understanding for those that endure the mind altering chaos that depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, and many other mental illnesses are to that individual.  And that mental illness is just that – an illness.  Perhaps better psychiatric healthcare and living with equality and tolerance would be a more appropriate solution?

The discrimination that those who live with psychiatric illnesses reminds me of those who have had the burden of being discriminated for being gay.  On an episode of Oprah’s Master Class, the struggle for acceptance by one comedian, Ellen DeGeneres, who suffered heart breaking loss for coming out as a gay individual and stating that she is gay on her sitcom show caused such controversy that her career was immediately stopped and a new beginning years later needed to occur.  This type of discrimination has to stop.  And fortunately this was one of the major steps to increasing some sort of tolerance, though much work still needs to be done.  It is when courage to be oneself is displayed that barriers to discrimination can be fought to be eliminated.  The intolerance within society just for living as an openly gay person has been a hard and brave fight for justice and respect.  This fight is similar to the mental illness stigma and breaking the walls of inequality.

When mental illness controls, how the mind torments and twists is like a cancer living within.  There is nothing remotely funny about how living with this illness can be.  I recently watched a popular television comedy about the fact that people can and do need psychiatric hospitalization.  Sure, this was all in fun for Halloween  with the Mad or Crazy Psychiatric Hospital being the joke.   However there once was a time when Psychiatric Disorders were evil and so completely misunderstood that people lived images of these comedic imaginations.  We have come forward in our thinking in small steps, yet much improvement still needs to be made.  How sad is it that it is hilarious that people live with unimaginable torture of the mind and it is still being displayed as comedy?

Equality of healthcare for psychiatric disorders and a respect and justice with fairness and the dis-solution of stereotypical responses to mental illness would be an important step for abolishing this discrimination.  A mental illness needs to be treated just as fairly as any other illness – with respect,  and to even separate healthcare coverage relating to mental health issues seems unjust.  A better acceptance and understanding is what the goal needs to be so that maybe those people who live with mental illness will no longer need to live in the closet.

Brave Justice

Brave Justice

The discrimination toward those with mental illness is a tragedy.  To think that we are still in the midst of comedians joking about those with mental illness, being compared to criminals whenever the thought of mental illness is brought up, while also many saying that gun control is a must due to mental illness or perhaps better involuntary psychiatric hospitalization may be the solution to unimaginable crime within society.  Absurd!  This type of discrimination, stereotyping, stigma needs to stop.  There has to be compassion and understanding for those that endure the mind altering chaos that depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, and many other mental illnesses are to that individual.  And that mental illness is just that – an illness.  Perhaps better psychiatric healthcare and living with equality and tolerance would be a more appropriate solution?

The discrimination that those who live with psychiatric illnesses reminds me of those who have had the burden of being discriminated for being gay.  On an episode of Oprah’s Master Class, the struggle for acceptance by one comedian, Ellen DeGeneres, who suffered heart breaking loss for coming out as a gay individual and stating that she is gay on her sitcom show caused such controversy that her career was immediately stopped and a new beginning years later needed to occur.  This type of discrimination has to stop.  And fortunately this was one of the major steps to increasing some sort of tolerance, though much work still needs to be done.  It is when courage to be oneself is displayed that barriers to discrimination can be fought to be eliminated.  The intolerance within society just for living as an openly gay person has been a hard and brave fight for justice and respect.  This fight is similar to the mental illness stigma and breaking the walls of inequality.

When mental illness controls, how the mind torments and twists is like a cancer living within.  There is nothing remotely funny about how living with this illness can be.  I recently watched a popular television comedy about the fact that people can and do need psychiatric hospitalization.  Sure, this was all in fun for Halloween  with the Mad or Crazy Psychiatric Hospital being the joke.   However there once was a time when Psychiatric Disorders were evil and so completely misunderstood that people lived images of these comedic imaginations.  We have come forward in our thinking in small steps, yet much improvement still needs to be made.  How sad is it that it is hilarious that people live with unimaginable torture of the mind and it is still being displayed as comedy?

Equality of healthcare for psychiatric disorders and a respect and justice with fairness and the dis-solution of stereotypical responses to mental illness would be an important step for abolishing this discrimination.  A mental illness needs to be treated just as fairly as any other illness – with respect,  and to even separate healthcare coverage relating to mental health issues seems unjust.  A better acceptance and understanding is what the goal needs to be so that maybe those people who live with mental illness will no longer need to live in the closet.

The Spirit Within

Forgiveness

I have always been an authentic person.  I think of myself as compassionate to others, honest, and I try my best to help others that are in need.   I always try to maintain my integrity, and live with trying to do what’s right.

It is when my integrity is questioned that it makes me wonder how that person is really thinking of me as a person.  Do they really think that I can be that heartless and unkind?  Am I, in their eyes, this unworthy person that should be avoided?

How can these distant views be so evident?  It is beyond me.  The situation is heart wrenching.  Aren’t we suppose to believe the best in someone?  Yes this, at all times is hard.  But when the beliefs of someone questions the values of a person, best intentions have to be maintained.  Does this other person really think of me in that light?  Where is this coming from?  Have I been known to be that way?  Is that my style?

Perhaps that was not their intention?  Do I move on, or stay stuck in the hurt.  I’m moving on for me.  Breathe a deep breath in, exhale.

Stand By My Side

stand by my side

My husband is forever the man who will hear a song and can relate that song to his life experiences.  This particular song he relates to both of us – my struggle with Bipolar and his struggle and feelings of helplessness while dealing with my illness.  This interpretation helped me to see HIS perspective on living with my illness.  And sometimes it is so important to see things in a different light.

This also explains the deeper meaning that Rob Thomas, the singer, has explained in the past.  This is Thomas’ feeling of helplessness in dealing with his wife’s struggle with an autoimmune disease.

http://www.rheumatoidarthritisguy.com/2009/07/autoimmune-disease-her-diamonds/

Moments to Remember / Daytona Beach

Daytona

An amazing bright yellow sunrise over the clear blue ocean as we sit on the deck at our hotel room on Daytona Beach.  It’s a warm summer morning.  Our coffee is ready and we each have a package of Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups for breakfast.  Yummy.  My love gently wakes me up to enjoy this peaceful morning romance!  Great start to the day.  Moments to Remember.

Moments to Remember / Daytona Beach

Daytona

An amazing bright yellow sunrise over the clear blue ocean as we sit on the deck at our hotel room on Daytona Beach.  It’s a warm summer morning.  Our coffee is ready and we each have a package of Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups for breakfast.  Yummy.  My love gently wakes me up to enjoy this peaceful morning romance!  Great start to the day.  Moments to Remember.

Wanting a Baby at Fifteen

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I had my first child at the age of fifteen.  She WAS planned and very much wanted, crazy as that may sound.  It seemed like a good idea and my growing mind and body decided, yes, it was time!  Ha.

So I conceived just after my fifteenth birthday. Being scared and thrilled at the same time, now it was time to tell my parents.  That proved to be dramatic and filled with emotions.

My dad, still the protector, decided it was time to kill my boyfriend.  My dad charged out of the home with that desire.  I called my boyfriend to warn him to run.  God, what was going on?  Well I can say my boyfriend, ex-husband, children’s father is still alive.

My mom seemed filled with anxiety.  And, as always, she was my loving mom but at the same time the reaction of my dad was in her full view.  Uncertainty was all around us.  Where would things go from here?

I had a counselor throughout my pregnancy that would pick me up from home and we would chat and go out for lunch together.  I believed that I had an ally.  Also thankfully, through the services that I had, I also received GED training and went for my GED at the age of fifteen.  I was not able to get my certificate until the year that I would have graduated, but that was truly the best action taken for me.  I was not aware of the benefits of until years later.  They truly had my back!

And with much love and gratitude, my mom and dad, after the initial transition period, stood firm by my side.  My mom told me that my social worker said that they could either support me and chose family, or resent me and the consequences could be damaging.  So with all their heart and soul they chose support.  I was blessed with the best parents ever!

To say that I would advocate for teenage pregnancy is absurd.  The trials of growing up myself while raising children was a daring and demanding trial.  And thankfully I had the support behind me to make that endeavor successful, after much effort.

The best action that I would recommend is to definitely grow up to be the best person that one can be independently before attempting to raise children themselves.  I was one of the “lucky” ones.  But with all of life’s difficulties, the outcome could have been much different or even devastating.